HISTORY Rocks! 

HISTORY Rocks! class emphasize collaboration through Socratic discussion and hands-on, creative activities designed to foster critical thinking and problem solving.

Mrs. Chiappe's CORE HISTORY classes

HISTORY Rocks! CORE HISTORY classes are CA Department of Education content standard aligned. 

History: Ancient Civilizations

Students will explore the ancient history through hands-on, creative activities designed to foster critical thinking and problem solving. For example, the students sculpt terracotta army soldiers while learning about ancient China. Other project based learned include Aztec calendars, creation of Greek pillars and Roman mosaics. Students MAKE the history they study!

History: World History in the Middle Ages  

Through hands-on project-based learning, students study the social, cultural, and technological changes that occurred in Europe, Africa, and Asia in the years A.D. 500-1789. After reviewing the ancient world and the ways in which archaeologists and historians uncover the past, students study the history and geography of great civilizations that were developing concurrently throughout the world during medieval and early modern times. They learn to think critical and work collaboratively through hands on project...such as building replicas of castles and creating medieval shields. Finally, students assess the political forces let loose by the Enlightenment, particularly the rise of democratic ideas, and they learn about the continuing influence of these ideas in the world today.

History: Uinited States

Students study the ideas, issues, and events from the framing of the Constitution (beginning with colonization) up to reconstruction following the Civil War.  After reviewing the development of America's democratic institutions, particularly the shaping of the Constitution, students trace the development of American politics, society, culture, and economy and relate them to the emergence of major regional differences. They learn about the challenges facing the new nation, with an emphasis on the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War. They make connections between the rise of industrialization and contemporary social and economic conditions.

History: California  

Through hands-on, project-based learning, students learn the story of their home state, unique in American history in terms of its vast and varied geography, its many waves of immigration beginning with pre-Columbian societies, its continuous diversity, economic energy, and rapid growth. In addition to the specific treatment of milestones in California history, students examine the state in the context of the rest of the nation, with an emphasis on the U.S. Constitution and the relationship between state and federal government.

History: World History in the Modern Era

It's been said, that now more than ever, other countries and customs affect our everyday lives―and our children need to learn about the people who live all around the world. Students will study the major historical events in the years A.D.1850-2000; from the Middle East and China to Africa and the Americas, discovering what happened all around the world in the last century and a half. 

K-3 History: People, Places, and Ideas that make America Unique
Through hands-on project based learning,  games, and songs,  students explore the meaning of good citizenship, national symbols, influential leaders, geography, time and chronology, and life in the past. This is a standards based class that is intended to spark a love for HISTORY in K-3 graders! 

 

K-3 History: People who Changed the World

Ordinary people have changed the world!  Through hands-on project based learning, students explore the lives and historic impact of a variety of ordinary people; Helen Keller, Sacagawea, and Albert Einstein to name a few!  This is a standards based class that is intended to spark a love for HISTORY in K-3 graders! 

Mrs. Chiappes SOCIAL STUDIES classes

Architects & Engineers

Travel through history and across the world visiting iconic buildings, bridges, and monuments from ancient civilizations to the most technologically advanced modern structures. Through hands-on, project-based learning, students are immersed in these wonders, becoming actual  architects and engineers! 

American Cinema 

In this course students will participate in a survey of classic American cinema, from a historical and cultural perspective. The student will be exposed to various movie clips, such as Charlie Chaplin, 2001 Space Odyssey, and  Gone with the Wind while discovering the films cultural context. Students will also explore the influence of media on the American experience and the importance of understanding  worldview portrayed in cinema.

Civics: Analyzing Current Events

Analyzing current events helps middle and high school students better understand the world around them. Through socratic class discussion, students will learn to critically think about the facts and history behind the headlines while gaining understanding of the importance of people, events, and issues in the news. Today’s students need an understanding of the world’s economy, politics, social structures, and environment in order to become active, informed citizens. At the same time, consuming news with a critical eye is vital to enhancing democracy. Special attention will be paid to credibility of sources, bias, and discerning fact from fiction.  

Civics: Documents of Freedom

Students will study the documents that are the basis of the American experience, beginning with the Magna Carta & Mayflower Compact. Particular emphasis is given to the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Through the examination of primary source documents, students will gain a deeper understanding of the rights of responsibilities of American citizenship. This class completes US History. High school students are encouraged to enroll. 

Civics: Individual Rights & Liberties

Through Socratic group discussion, and case study, students will explore the rights and liberties contained in the United States Constitution. Topics will include such things as symbolic speech and freedom of the press. This class is different from, and does not repeat case material from Constitutional Debate. This class is taught by Mrs. Chiappe, a former practicing California Attorney.

Civics: Presidential Election Process

Students will explore the election and voting process in the United States.  Activities will be used to familiarize students with the terminology, practices, and traditions of American Elections. Particular attention will be paid to what the Constitution says about elections and voting.  Additionally, various types of elections and the history of political parties will be explored. During the class, students will create their own personalized “textbook” by adding handouts, notes, and other material to a journal. The class will conclude with an election simulation activity to give students an opportunity to experience the election process firsthand. High school students are encouraged to enroll. 

Civics: You and the Law 

In this course students should gain a practical understanding of law and the legal system in the United States. What is the difference between a tort and a crime? Are robbery and burglary the same? How does assault compare to battery? Students will examine parties to crimes and contracts, elements of various crimes and causes of action, and punishment of crimes. Case studies and hypothetical situations will be examined and debated.  In addition, students should be exposed to the many career opportunities that exist within the legal system. This class is taught by Mrs. Chiappe, a former practicing California Attorney.

Constitutional Debate

Students will review, debate and ultimately decide actual court cases based on the first eight amendments to the Constitution. Students will sharpen their critical thinking skills and their legal and historical knowledge as they analyze the amendments, discover their origins, and rule on actual cases presented before the U.S. Supreme Court. Cases will be analyzed, not only from a Constitutional perspective but also from an ethical world view. This class will be taught by Mrs. Chiappe, a former practicing California Attorney.

DaVinci's World: STEAM

Leonardo da Vinci was one of history's most interesting and influential characters. Through hands-on projects, in this STEAM class (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math), students are introduced to both the Renaissance and the life, world, and incredible mind of Leonardo da Vinci as an example of a person whose interests encompassed different areas of knowledge : painter, anatomist, engineer, architect, musician, stage set designer, mathematician, inventor, and much more.

Eat Up! Food around the World

In this class, students will study world cultures through the lense of food. Each week, students will be introduced to a different region of the world and examine why the people of that area eat the food they eat.  Emphasis will be placed on what kids their same age eat for lunch. Did you know that in Brazil, school children often have baked plantains for lunch?  In class, students will have the opportunity to prepare and taste diverse dishes, while studying the geography and the history of different cultures.

Hip Hop Civics: Hamilton, An American Musical

The smash-hit musical "Hamilton" has ignited students' interest in history, creating a ready-made opportunity for teachers. The Broadway musical tells the story of Alexander Hamilton, the "Ten dollar founding father without a father,” in rap and hip-hop songs. This class capitalizes on students' interest in pop culture by using the show as a teaching tool—in terms of learning about history, language arts, and diversity in pop culture. WARNING: The uncensored Hamilton Broadway soundtrack contains mature language. Every effort will be made to assure that all classroom material will be censored. Additionally, the story of Alexander Hamilton’s life includes mature themes, such as illigitmacy and infidelity. 

The Bible and its Influence

The Bible has been and is one of the most influential books ever published. It is a sacred text to Jews and Christians, and it has the respect of Muslims and other members of world religions.  The Bible’s influence is seen in literature, art, music, culture, public policy, and public debate. In this class, the Bible will be studied academically, not devotionally, to learn about the stories and history of text as culturally used by groups from musicians to politicians. This class is entirely secular and while students will study about religion as presented in the Bible, students will not be engaged in the practice of religion and will not be asked to accept religion. The class is designed to give students an opportunity to see how Biblical knowledge can be a key to better understanding other subjects - especially literature, art, music, and the social sciences. 

Mock Trial

Mock trials have proven to be an effective learning tool for students of all grade levels. It helps them understand the law, practice critical thinking, and gain greater confidence with public speaking by assuming the roles of attorneys and witnesses in a fictional criminal or civil trial. Students experience first-hand the difficulties that judges, lawyers and juries face in determining which facts are relevant and what legal arguments are effective. This class will be taught by Mrs. Chiappe, a former practicing California Attorney.

Monuments of Freedom 

Travel through history and across the United States visiting iconic monuments and memorials. Through hands-on, project based learning, students will be immersed in these wonders, becoming actual  architects and engineers as they build replicas of the monuments! Through an examination of the American monuments, students will develop an appreciation and recognition of American history's greatest people and principles. In-class activities will serve as  a springboard for further discovery and exploration of the United States, its history and culture. Throughout the semester we will focus on a different “Monuments of Freedom." This class enhances, and does not duplicate, material presented in US History.

National Treasure: US History through Cinema

In this course, students will use the 2004 movie, National Treasure (PG),  as the backdrop to explore geography,  historical events and figures, as well as literary themes.  In the movie, the protagonist uncovers a plot to steal the Declaration of Independence. The historic events and individuals referenced through the movie will be analyzed and discussed in class. Additionally, we will examine themes within the movie such as liberty and freedom. Each week the students will complete one hands-on project based on the topic studied.  At the end of the course, the students will watch the movie in its entirety, focusing on discerning fact from fiction. This class enhances, and does not duplicate, material presented in US History.

National Treasure, Book of Secrets: US History through Cinema

In this course, students will use the 2007 movie, National Treasure: Book of Secrets (PG),  as the backdrop to explore geography,  historical events and figures, as well as literary themes. The historic events and individuals referenced through the movie will be analyzed and discussed in class. Additionally, we will examine themes within the movie such as liberty and freedom. Each week the students will complete one hands-on project based on the topic studied.  At the end of the course, the students will watch the movie in its entirety, focusing on discerning fact from fiction. This class enhances, and does not duplicate, material presented in US History.

Night at the Museum: History Comes Alive

In this course, students will use the 2006 movie, Night at the Museum (PG), as the backdrop to explore geography,  historical figures, and literary themes.  In the movie, historical figures on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York magically come to life at night!  In class, after watching video clips from the movie,  students will learn about the various key characters in the movie that “come to life” in the film. Additionally, we will examine themes within the movie such as collaboration, dedication, and hope. Each week the students will complete one hands-on project based on the topic/character studied.  At the end of the course, the students will watch the movie in its entirety, focusing on discerning fact from fiction.

What's the Verdict? Courtroom Debate

To sharper their critical thinking skills, students serve as the judge and jury in tricky courtroom cases. In this discussion based class, students hear the facts of actual courtroom cases. After reviewing the applicable law, students apply the facts of the particular case to the law,  deliberate, and come to a verdict. Once they’ve handed down their decision, we will see if their opinion matches the one of the real life court. Then they will tract the case to the appeals court and see if it overrules their verdict. Additionally, in this class, students will hone their debate skills by learning to clearly articulate their opinions and persuade their peers.  This class is taught by Mrs. Chiappe, a former practicing California Attorney.

World Religions

World Religions exposes students to different contemporary faiths and examines their development, their impact throughout history, and their continuing influence on today’s world affairs. Students will think about and discuss the ways in which different individuals and groups have explained the relationship between human beings and the divine as well as the differences and similarities among the different belief systems. In a country founded on religious freedom, and in the state of California where there is remarkable religious diversity, students benefit from gaining knowledge of the world’s major faiths.

World Geography

This class is designed to complement any Social Studies curriculum. Through project based learning, students will explore the importance of geography and the world in which they live. Geographers use five themes to study the world around us; these five geographical themes will be explored throughout the class: Location, Place, Human-Environment Interactions, Movement, and Regions. Additionally, the classroom study of geography will include video presentations, map work, and vocabulary. 

Mrs. Chiappes OTHER amazing classes
 

Card Sharks

Before video games, what did early Americans do for fun? Some played cards! Did you know the Stamp Act (which was one factor that led to the American Revolution) taxed playing cards? This class uses decks of cards, engaging card games, and card based magic tricks to reinforce mathematical computation, strategy, and critical thinking.  Students will study the history, cultural context, and rules of a variety of card games and card based magic tricks, while focusing on the critical lifelong  skills of collaboration and cooperation.  In this class, students learn while playing...the way education should be! WARNING: Family card games may become part of your weekend tradition.

Economics and You

Economics and You explores real world applications of economics in a way that is relevant to students today. In today’s challenging economic times, ensuring that students understand the value of a dollar and what it can buy is vital to their long-term financial health.  The class breaks down topics such as Laws of Supply and Demand into easy to understand examples. Vocabulary and basic economic laws will be introduced and to spark student interest, case studies, and other activities will be used. This class will lay the groundwork for students to grow into financially responsible adults. 

Leadership & Service: Student Government

​Through a series of guided interaction and group exercises, students will explore the principles of leadership and learn to develop individual and group leadership skills to impact their lives and their communities. Content areas include decision-making, goal setting, effective communication, servant leadership, organization and time management skills, and concrete strategies to implement change. Additionally, by planning FLA events and activities, this class gives the homeschool student the unique opportunity to experience traditional "student government" without attending a school.

Philosophy for Kids

In this class students will have the opportunity to become acquitted with the wonders of philosophy. Through Socratic discussion students will be invited to think about questions that philosophers have been discussing since the time of the ancient Greeks. “What does it mean to be fair?” “Can something be logical ever not make sense?” Each question includes a fun activity that allows students to increase their understanding of philosophical concepts and issues and enjoy themselves at the same time. 

Speak Up! Speech & Debate

This course explores concepts in public speaking, critical thinking, argument and debate. Students will study different styles of speeches, learn rhetorical strategies and practice the art of debate. A major focus of the class will be the elements of rhetoric as it pertains to information, persuasion and debate. The students will give several speeches to classmates. Various styles of speech will be studied, including: persuasion, impromptu, extemporaneous, and debate.

 

STEM - Student Engineering

STEM Student Engineering is a blended learning environment where Science, Technology, Engineering and Math are applied by students to everyday life. STEM teaches students computational thinking and focuses on the real world applications of problem solving. Through hands on activities, the students work individually and collaboratively as engineers. Engineering involves the application of creativity in partnership with other disciplines to search for quicker, better and less expensive ways to use the forces and materials of nature to meet today's challenges. The STEM Student Engineers are problem solvers who use various resources to bring into existence things and ideas that they imagine.

Wide World of Sports

From Badminton to Rugby, explore the wide world of sports while honing the valuable life skills of teamwork and sportsmanship! Each week, the class will focus on the rules and history of a new and engaging World sport. The students will have an opportunity to play the game they studied and possibly develop an undiscovered passion. 

Yearbook

In this course students gain useful, real world skills in time management, marketing, teamwork, and design principles.  Collaboratively, the students will produce a creative, innovative yearbook recording Foothill Learning Academy memories and events. Students learn page design, publishing techniques, copywriting, and editing. A laptop computer is required for this class.

Young Entrepreneurs

Young Entrepreneurs enables students to learn first-hand about the risks and rewards of operating a small business. Students examine the definition of entrepreneurship and small business, while providing an overview of the past and present small business environment. Students will explore considerations involved with turning an idea into a business: identifying a passion or hobby that can provide a product or service, researching the market, and weighing the risks of starting a small business. Lastly, students study the nuts and bolts of starting a business: writing a business plan, obtaining funding, and learning about the agencies businesses interact with to become a legitimate entity.